If your closet, wardrobe, or space, in general, is limited– or you just want some more efficient means of organization– searching for the right storage methods can bring about more than a few headaches. Freestanding closets! Expensive ottomans! Strangely holiday-themed plastic boxes! There’s not exactly a shortage of options, but sometimes the simplest changes are the most effective.

Separate your drawers.

If this means physical separation, then reusing shoe boxes or old desk organizers can make sure the socks on the left side of the drawer do in fact stay on the left side of the drawer. There are, of course, dedicated drawer organizers you can buy, sometimes made with the particular specs of a piece of furniture in mind. If it’s just visualization you need, you can start by putting down some decorative tape on the bottom of the drawer to block out different areas for different articles.

Mind the shoes.

One of the easiest and most important ways you can keep your space organized is by keeping shoes on a shoe rack or an over-the-door shoe organizer. These can go on the inside of a closet, of course, if you prefer these methods stowed away, but there’s also plenty of attractive options for organizing shoes visibly (as well as simple DIY projects that will do the trick.) Not only will these options save space– they’ll also make finding your shoes a lot easier!

Use specialized hangers.

While most of us are familiar with what a scarf or tie hanger involves, there’s a variety of other space-saving hanging methods available. Some shirt hangers, for instance, can fit as many as four or five items on them, arranged vertically. Pants hangers can be used to store more than just pants, of course; shirts and sweaters that somehow always end up on the floor can be kept in order with some simple clips. There are also devices you can use to thread multiple existing clothes hangers together, should you be looking for some cheaper space optimization.

Keep seasonal items stored away.

Oftentimes, our closets and dressers end up full of pieces we don’t wear for months at a time– making it harder to both sift through our clothes and fit what we actually need. Vacuum sealing or using old cardboard boxes can help solve this problem, particularly in the winter and summer months when shorts or sweaters respectively serve little purpose. While Kentucky weather can be unpredictable, this can be accounted for by leaving a handful of warmer or cooler clothes out in case of an ‘emergency’.

Donate or sell clothes you can’t see yourself wearing.

We’ve all bought something only to find it languishing in the very back of our closet; sometimes we tell ourselves we’ll wear it eventually, or perhaps on a special occasion, but if the time comes and it remains there– it might be time to reconsider. While donating clothes to a thrift store or a charitable organization are great ways to repurpose something for someone who could really need it, the age of the internet has made it so selling your own clothes is easier than ever. Apps like Poshmark, Depop, and thredUP allow you to ship to buyers as close by or as far-reaching as you prefer.