We’ve all been reminded at one point or another to turn out the lights before we leave a room or switch off an idle television, but are we doing everything we can to conserve energy? Not only is doing so kinder to the environment but saving electricity means saving money, too. Luckily, there are lots of small ways to save that add up, so keep reading for tips on making some small changes that can have a big impact.

Unplug any appliances when you’re not using them.

Even when turned off, there’s a number of devices and appliances that still consume electricity when plugged in. That’s why pulling the plug on things when they’re not in use is always a good idea, and so much so that it’s estimated doing this one simple task will save you up to 10% on electricity costs. With that said, there are other ways to keep your plugged-in items from taking up quite so much energy, such as in the case of smart plugs and power strips.

Use energy-conscious light bulbs.

Both CFL and LED bulbs are a much more efficient alternative to traditional incandescent bulbs– especially LED light bulbs, which also have the added benefit of coming in a variety of interesting shapes, sizes, and colors. Halogen bulbs are a rare sight nowadays, but it’s worth noting that replacing these electricity-guzzling light sources with a more efficient alternative can make a major difference in your energy consumption.

Use the dishwasher when you can.

While running a dishwasher is a task not without the use of electricity, it’s actually considered more energy-efficient than handwashing by resources like the California Energy Commission. Less time, less work, less electricity– it’s a trifecta of compelling reasons why loading up the dishwasher is a smart choice whenever possible. When it comes to drying your dishes, however, air drying is still the best option.

Don’t take your time opening the door.

Leaving your doors and windows open is a quick way to overwork your AC or heater, as well as waste the output from those devices. It’s why on hot summer days, it may be best to keep those windows shut and stick with just the artificial means of cooling off (or vice versa with all-natural methods.)

Keep the water cool (when you can, that is.)

Unless you’re looking to get some serious gunk out of your clothing, filling the washing machine up with cool water rather than hot is a quick way to save a good chunk of electricity on laundry day. The same goes for showers; while a cold shower might not be the most appealing, there are benefits to washing your hair, for instance, with cool water (and cold water is good for blood circulation, too.)